$250,000 Marin County sea level study paints apocalyptic picture for future generations

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 11:41PM
In Marin County Tuesday, the department of public works held a public meeting marked by hard facts, fear, and hope. The subject -- how rising seas will impact low-lying areas.


SAUSALITO, Calif. - In Mill Valley Tuesday night, the A's took on the Orioles in a battle of friends, rivals -- and probable future allies in the fight against rising seas from climate change.

If we're to believe climate models and a new county-sanctioned report, the ball field that the two teams played on Tuesday could be under water within decades or even years. The kids playing will see it.

"The time to ask is right now," said Chris Choo, the principle planner for Marin County's Department of Public Works.

The department held an informational meeting not far from the game, for many it served as an eye-opener.

"It is a little scary -- I admit," said Marin County resident Linda Lee.

"A lot of people think it is not happening," said Corte Madera resident Julie Jay. "But they just need to look at our streets and our highways."

Like late winter, when king tides turned streets into near waterways, flooding at the infamous Manzanita parking lot near Mill Valley could become the new norm.
And with as much as 70 inches of sea level rise in the next 100 years, we could see even worse.
Imagine flooded roads isolating highlanders in or away from their homes -- and towns like San Anselmo flooding more often due to backed up water from the Bay.

And yet, by beginning to adapt now, the county says there is hope.

"You do it piece by piece," said Stephanie Moulton-Peters of the Mill Valley City Council. "Not all at once."
Estimated costs are in the billions of dollars, and if we do nothing, well, who wants to do that to a group of grown-up little leaguers.
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