New attorney for suspect in road rage killing

July 10, 2008 12:52:03 PM PDT
A suspected gang member accused in the June 22 slaying of a San Francisco man and two of his sons was granted a new defense attorney today in San Francisco Superior Court, after his previous attorney said he had a conflict in the case.

Edwin Ramos, 21, of El Sobrante, appeared briefly in court this morning, where his attorney Joseph O'Sullivan told Judge Lucy McCabe that he had previously represented another person involved in the case, and asked to be removed as Ramos' attorney.

McCabe granted the request, and attorney Robert Amparan was appointed to take his place.

Ramos' scheduled plea entry in the case was postponed until July 31. Amparan said outside the courtroom that he expects Ramos will plead not guilty.

"And I expect it to be not guilty when the jury verdicts come back," Amparan added.

Ramos has been charged in the murders of Anthony "Tony" Bologna, 48, and two of his sons Michael, 20, and Matthew, 16, after what police have called a "traffic altercation" in San Francisco's Excelsior District.

Prosecutors have charged Ramos, who remains in custody on a no-bail status, with three counts of murder and multiple special allegations involving gang membership, firearm use and multiple murders.

On the afternoon of June 22, police found Bologna and his sons shot inside their car just after 3 p.m. near the intersection of Maynard and Congdon streets, according to police.

Though their investigation is still under way, police have said the shooting occurred after an altercation involving Bologna's car and as many as three people in another car.

Tony and Michael Bologna were pronounced dead at the scene. Matthew Bologna was rushed to San Francisco General Hospital and was removed from life support two days later, police reported.

Ramos is thought to be a member of the Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13, street gang and is believed by police to have fired the shots from the other car, a Chrysler 300 that police recovered at Ramos' residence.

Amparan said he is just beginning to review evidence in the case, but agreed with O'Sullivan's prior statements that the evidence against Ramos would likely not be enough to convict him.

"Based on what little I know of the case," having spoken with O'Sullivan, Ramos and Ramos' family, he said, "I understand why Mr. O'Sullivan was so positive in his feelings about the case, and I think we're going to be able to do the same work for Mr. Ramos."

Amparan would not elaborate on what evidence, or lack thereof, he thought was so compelling.


Load Comments