Slow food explained

August 22, 2008 12:00:00 AM PDT
You have probably heard of the slow food movement which began over 20 years ago in Italy. One of its purposes was to preserve and promote local and traditional food products, and that movement has great momentum here in the Bay Area, thanks to Anya Fernald, executive director of Slow Food Nation. Fernald explains how to dedicate a little bit more time to the role food plays in our lives

What is slow food?
Slow food is a philosophy of living where food is a big priority. It's a celebration of healthy, delicious, sustainable food.

Recipe: Tomato Sauce from Fresh Tomatoes
This bright, flavorful sauce is perfect in the heat of summer when tomatoes are abundant.

  • 3 large tomatoes
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Grate the tomatoes on a box grater. This will remove the skins and seeds - leaving a soft pulp. Heat olive oil in a wide skillet. Add garlic and cook on low heat for 3 minutes. Add grated tomato pulp and cook until reduced by about one-third - approximately 20 minutes. Add salt and a handful of fresh herbs - if you like. Serve on al dente pasta with a generous topping of grated parmesan - spaghetti and tagliatelle type paste both work well in this dish.

Slow Food Nation
Labor Day weekend, August 29 to September 1. At Civic Center you'll find a marketplace packed with California artisan goods and local produce alongside a giant organic vegetable garden. A Taste Pavilion at Fort Mason will showcase handmade products and regional specialties. Marketplace admission is free; pavilion entry $20 and up.

For more information, visit slowfoodnation.org.

About Anya Fernald:
Anya Fernald brings five years of international experience in food and agriculture to the position of Community Alliance with Family Farmers (CAFF) Program Director. Anya came to CAFF after five years as Program Director for the Slow Food Foundation, where she worked with farmers and food producers in 25 countries on rural development through marketing and processing development. At Slow Food, Anya also co-authored a book - Food, Culture, Community - and has written for a variety of publications, including Saveur, Slow, and SlowArk magazines.

Before joining Slow Food, Anya worked in Southeastern Sicily for the Consorzio Ricerca Filiera Lattiero Casearia, a rural development institute that worked to promote traditional cheesemaking in one of Europe's poorest regions. After graduating from Wesleyan University, Anya was awarded a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship to pursue a year of independent academic study about traditional cheesemaking.


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