Local campaign voluntees still working hard

September 28, 2008 7:27:45 PM PDT
California is considered by many political analysts to be an "easy win" for Senator Obama, but Democrats and Republicans in the Bay Area are still working hard raising money and gathering volunteers.

Presidential campaigns aren't all glitz and glamour. Volunteers for the San Mateo County McCain Presidential Campaign are doing the tedious task of checking up on all local voters who registered republican or declined to state in 2004.

"And let them know that there's a campaign here and our intention here is to win the county and to win the state," says Mike Maletic, San Mateo County McCain Presidential Campaign.

Optimistic McCain supporters in San Francisco are making about 2,000 calls a day from their phone bank on mission street to local voters.

This effort helps them whiddle down their list of McCain supporters so they can follow up just before election day.

"When the campaign's good, people come in droves, and if it wasn't good, people wouldn't be coming in here to be doing it on their own steam," says Leo Lacayo, Vice Chair Republican Party, San Francisco.

But the Golden State isn't the only focus for the McCain and Obama campaigns.

California volunteers from both parties are calling voters in those states or even being sent to help get out the vote.

"We call voters in key swing states, like Nevada, New Mexico and Colorado to persuade them to vote for Obama if they can," says Hoa Long Tam, Volunteer for Marin County Obama Campaign.

Volunteers at the Marin Democratic headquarters are using their free night and weekend minutes on their cell phones to make calls to the battleground state of Nevada. Its five Electoral College votes could be critical in a close election. Obama campaign volunteers are blanketing Reno and the rest of Washoe County to pick up any votes that could swing the election their way.

"I actually went to Nevada last Saturday and just on Saturday we knocked on 15, 600 doors,"says Tam.

California may not be a swing state, but it still provides big money for the national campaigns for Republicans and Democrats.


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