Osteoarthritis: How to keep joints healthy

October 27, 2008 12:00:00 AM PDT
From high heels to estrogen, what women need to know about osteoarthritis.

Special considerations for women's joints and osteoarthritis (OA):

Women have low quad muscle strength (thigh) before developing OA of knee -- need to build up quads to keep knee joints intact.

Weight gain has a greater impact on women - 3x more knee OA in heaviest vs lightest women in Framingham study.

Women more likely to have knock-knees (biking/swimming maybe better choice over jogging).

Low Vitamin D = 3.3x more OA.

Loss of estrogen = more OA and more symptoms (special supplements/vitamins taken around menopause can help).

Shoe wear = bunions, high heels can increase knee and low back OA.

Carrying heavy bags -- can take their tolls on shoulders and hands.

Osteoarthritis is affecting younger and more active people everyday.

Suggestions

1. Deal with Injuries -- how to avoid and what to do if you get injured -- R.I.C.E.R -- Rest. Ice. Compression. Elevate. Rehab.

2. Add nutritional support (key for women) -- vitamin D, fish oil, calcium.

3. Follow a Mediterranean Diet -- sample foods like avocado, nuts, whole grains, salmon.

4. Engage in Regular Self-Paced Exercise -- best forms of exercise for certain body parts -- quads for knees, cycling, walking. Also be careful of impact exercises, such as running and tennis.

5. Maintain a healthy weight -- every extra 10 pounds increases risk of arthritis by 1.4

About Dr. Jason Theodosakis, AKA "Dr. Theo":
Jason Theodosakis, MD, MS, MPH, FACPM or "Dr. Theo", is the author of the international #1 New York Times bestseller The Arthritis Cure -- the book that changed the paradigm for how arthritis is treated today. Dr. Theo is a practicing medical doctor who specializes in clinical preventative and sports medicines at Canyon Ranch Medical Department, a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine and a former director of the University of Arizona's Preventive Medicine Residency Training Program.

Dr. Theo is residency-trained and board-certified in Preventive Medicine and fellowship-trained in Sports Medicine. He holds a doctoral medical degree from the University of Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School and master's degrees in Exercise and Sports Sciences and Public Health from the University of Arizona where he graduated summa cum laude.

As one of the world's foremost authorities on the clinical use of dietary supplements for arthritis, Dr. Theo is on the oversight committee for the $16 million NIH trial on glucosamine and chondroitin (GAIT) and was named one of the world's 14 greatest doctors by Rodale Press. GAIT was funded to validate the theory that the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin had a synergistic effect in joint health in patients with significant symptoms of osteoarthritis, and that these supplements could outperform prescription medication for pain management.

Over 40 clinical research trials support Dr. Theo's theories and tens of millions of people successfully follow his program. He is committed to maintaining the integrity of the program's principles, including quality control within the dietary supplement industry and the development of novel, new approaches to conquering arthritis, the most common cause of chronic pain and disability.

Dr. Theo's media experience is extensive and includes appearances on The Today Show, CBS Early Show, CNN's America's Newsroom, numerous local network affiliates and nationally syndicated radio. He has been quoted in hundreds of health and consumer print publications including PARADE, USA Weekend, Woman's World, Family Circle, Natural Health and others.


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