Pastors boycott NAACP Banquet over Prop 8

November 21, 2008 12:00:00 AM PST
The emotion and strong-feelings on both sides of Proposition 8 divided leaders in the African-American community on Friday night. At the annual NAACP Banquet in San Francisco some pastors chose to boycott because of another's stance on same-sex marriage.

"Seizing our moment of triumph" was the NAACP celebratory theme for this major fundraiser, but conversation often still centered on Proposition 8 and Rev. Amos Brown's much publicized stance to support same-sex marriage civil rights.

"Tonight our national president, Ben Jealous, will be here to show he stands with us. And for the state president Alice Huffman to be here, to say, 'We stand with you,' I think it speaks volumes," said Rev. Amos Brown, the San Francisco NAACP President.

One woman isn't even a member of the NAACP, but she felt compelled to come.

"I read that this event was going to be boycotted because the Rev. Amos Brown had spoken in favor of No on 8. I thought if they're going to boycott it, I'm going. I'm only one person, but I put my $150 in," said Delores Salomon, a San Francisco resident.

There were 460 reservations for Friday night's dinner. According the NAACP, some longtime contributors and pastors in the black community chose not to attend.

"That's troubling to me when I see that people who have always come forth to support us are not there at the forefront today, when we have so many issues before us. Not just the Prop 8 issue," said Minyon McGriff, NAACP upcoming vice president.

Outside the ballroom on Van Ness Street, one lone protestor stood steadfastly with his sign as he fended off derogatory remarks by passing motorists.

"I'm protesting Pastor Brown, the infamous Amos Brown. He's betrayed the black community and the church by his support of homosexual marriage," said Don Grundmann, with the American Warrior Ministry.

"I still love him, I still respect them, but I don't agree with what they're doing," said Rev. Amos Brown.

It appears the NAACP is supporting a new civil rights cause.


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