Halloween contest winner finally collects prize

November 28, 2008 6:21:59 PM PST
Imagine winning a contest, but not getting the prize that was promised? That happened to a young San Francisco woman this Halloween, so she turned to 7 On Your Side's Michael Finney for help.

The contest was part of San Francisco's Halloween celebration at AT&T Park.

Jean Storsetter loves to get all made up for Halloween.

"It's fun. I dress up," says Storsetter.

But this year she wanted to do something different.

"I try to outdo myself you know, each year," says Storsetter.

So she transformed her motorized wheel chair into a work of art and took her Halloween show on the road. Her human tank had clearly hit the target.

"Oh man, the minute I stepped out of my apartment I must have had so many people ask, saying cool costume, great costume, great idea," says Storsetter.

But this year her costume was more than just for fun. Her monthly disability check of $806 had run out, so she set out to win the city-sponsored Halloween costume contest held at AT&T Park. First prize was $500 and Storsetter won, but the prize money came up $300 short.

"I was like okay, what's up with this?" says Storsetter.

She called the organizers and the city, but didn't get many answers, so she e-mailed 7 On Your Side.

"I'm really glad that 7 On Your Side has let us know that the costume winner didn't get fully enumerated," San Francisco supervisor Bevan Duffy told 7 On Your Side.

Here's what happened. The city's first ever Halloween party at AT&T Park was funded entirely with donations. But those donations came up short, so organizers cut the prize money. When 7 On Your Side told the supervisor about it he personally donated $200.

"It's a happy check as far as I'm concerned," says Duffy.

And Bob Davis, president of the San Francisco Entertainment Commission, stepped up to the plate too, donating his own money -- $100 -- and making the prize complete.

"Acting in the same sense as the supervisor did, I felt that was the right thing to do," says Davis.

"Great. It will help me out," says Storsetter.

This year's Halloween in San Francisco was safe and violent-free, a nice contrast to the violence that broke out two years ago. The city wants that to continue and Supervisor Dufty hopes events like the one at AT&T Park return next year.


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