Osteoporosis and women

June 29, 2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
We have all heard milk builds strong bones. However, Dr. Amy Lanou, author of the new book, "Building Bone Vitality," says that calcium may not be the answer.

Overview

For years, doctors and scientists have been telling us to drink milk, eat dairy products, and take calcium pills to improve our bone vitality. The problem is, they're wrong. This groundbreaking guide uses the latest clinical studies and the most up-to-date medical information to help you strengthen your bones, reduce the risk of fractures, and prevent osteoporosis. You'll learn why there's no proof of dairy's usefulness, despite what doctors say, and why low-acid eating and daily walking is the most effective way to prevent bone loss.

BUILDING BONE VITALITY: A REVOLUTIONARY PLAN TO PREVENT BONE LOSS AND REVERSE OSTEOPOROSIS

THE BOTTOM LINE
The calcium theory is bankrupt. It just doesn't explain what causes-and prevents-osteoporosis. The best approach to osteoporosis prevention, the only one that makes scientific sense, is a diet very low in or devoid of animal foods and high in fruits and vegetables, combined with walking or equivalent exercise for 30 to 60 minutes a day, every day. That's the safe, simple, scientific prescription for osteoporosis prevention-and for optimal health and longevity.

In a new book published by McGraw-Hill (May 29, 2009), you will find the basics for BUILDING BONE VITALITY and preventing osteoporosis:

Buy the book on Amazon: Building Bone Vitality

A LOW-ACID EATING STYLE
For optimal bone health, avoid or strictly limit foods from animal sources to reduce the acid load of the diet. At the same time, be sure to eat more fruits and vegetables-at two servings per meal plus fruit snacks, for a total of six to nine servings a day.

DAILY WEIGHT-BEARING EXERCISE
Beyond a diet built from fruits and vegetables and other plant foods, one other thing is also vital for fracture prevention, daily weight-bearing exercise-walking or equivalent exercise (dancing, tennis, gardening, etc.) for 30 to 60 minutes a day.

BUILDING BONE VITALITY also:

Delves deeper into the critique of the calcium theory and the evidence in favor of low-acid eating.

Discusses why the low-acid approach has not been well publicized.

Lists more than 100 common foods and rates how acid-forming or alkaline they are. (The most alkaline foods may surprise you.)

Suggests easy ways to evolve your diet toward low-acid eating.

Offers quick, tasty recipes to help make the transition.

Explains how many other risk factors relate to fracture risk: diabetes, frailty, salt, caffeine, alcohol, smoking, depression, and prescription drugs.

Discusses all the osteoporosis drugs and the role they can play in fracture prevention.

Reveals how the pharmaceutical companies have exaggerated the drugs' effectiveness.

And explains how low-acid eating helps stop global warming and contributes to the health of the planet.

AUTHORS
Amy Joy Lanou, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of health and wellness at the University of North Carolina Asheville. She is the author of Healthy Eating for Life for Children and has appeared in Time and Newsweek and on National Public Radio.


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