Show support for returning soldiers

June 30, 2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
"Welcome Home," a DVD from the Veterans Health Research Institute, examines messages soldiers receive when they return from duty. Bay Area natives and veterans of the Iraq War, Mike Ergo and Christopher Loverro, share their experiences and give some guidance on what to say and not to say.

NCIRE-The Veterans Health Research Institute along with students from the SF Academy of Art have put together a video which has positive messages for soldiers coming back from war.

SUGGESTIONS ON WHAT TO SAY & NOT TO SAY

A rule of thumb is: "if you wouldn't ask it at your family dinner table, don't ask it at a social function to a complete stranger".

Suggestions for what people can say include:

  • Thank you for serving.
  • When did you get back?
  • What branch of the service were you in?
  • Welcome back
  • Thank you

What is on the do not list include:

  • What did you think of the war?
  • Are you opposed to the war?
  • Would you go back?
  • Are you okay (mentally)?
  • Does it suck?
  • Did you kill anyone?
  • Did you see anyone die?
  • Did you lose any friends?

About NCIRE-The Veterans Health Research Institute:
NCIRE - the Veterans Health Research Institute - is a self-funded private nonprofit research institute, established in 1988 to administer health research at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. We are the largest of the 85 nonprofit research institutes associated with the Department of Veterans Affairs nationwide.

NCIRE supports the research of over 200 MD and PhD principal investigators who work to improve health and health care for our veterans and active military personnel on the frontiers of many fields, including brain imaging, neurodegenerative disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, cardiovascular disease, cancer, hepatitis, and HIV. Our investigators include biologists, biochemists, cardiologists, epidemiologists, geriatric researchers, immunologists, molecular biologists, and neuroscientists. Most are directly involved in patient care.

NCIRE serves the needs of veterans, active military personnel, and the general public

For more information, visit www.NCIRE.org


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