Parts of city's bike plan to be implemented

November 30, 2009 1:10:21 PM PST
The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency will begin implementing bicycle network improvements this week after a judge partially lifted a four-year-old injunction Wednesday against the city's bike plan.

Work will begin on several projects as a result of the decision Wednesday by San Francisco Superior Court Judge Peter Busch, who said crews may proceed with the parts of the plan that "are least intrusive and most easily reversible."

The overall plan would add 34 miles of bike lanes to the city's 45-mile network, as well as 75 miles of bike routes with "sharrows," which indicate shared-use lanes with vehicles.

The SFMTA has chosen several improvement projects that will be allowed under the guidelines set by the decision.

They include bike lanes on Beale, Fremont, Howard, Otis, Scott, Mississippi, and Clipper streets, Seventh Avenue bike lanes and sharrows, John F. Kennedy Drive bike lanes, and Sloat Boulevard bike lanes. Bike racks will also be installed at various locations.

The SFMTA planned to announce a timeline and schedule today for when the projects will be implemented.

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom said in a statement that "While we had hoped for the complete removal of the injunction, this order paves the way for real growth in bicycling in San Francisco."

The court decision was the latest in a long legal battle involving the city's bike plan. San Francisco officials originally drafted the plan in 1997, and had its updated framework approved in 2005.

Opponents of the plan were granted an injunction that same year requiring that an environmental impact report be completed and certified before the plan moved forward.

The city's Planning Commission approved the environmental impact report in June, but its adequacy was challenged by the opposition groups.

Busch on Wednesday scheduled a June 1, 2010, hearing on the legal challenge to the environmental impact report.


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