Russian Fremont woman and son face deportation

May 28, 2010 5:48:16 PM PDT
About 200 students from Washington High School in Fremont marched in support of one of their classmates. The students carried American flags, wore red ribbons and chanted 'ICE be nice.'

The rally and march are to call attention to the deportation order of 16-year-old Eugene Kotelnikov and his mother, Tatiana Miroshnik. Both were born in Russia but came to Fremont 13 years ago.

In his first television interview Eugene says he remembers nothing about Russia and considers himself an American.

"I'm scared to go to Russia. I don't speak Russian, I won't know how to communicate, I'll be a shut- in my own house," he said.

Tatiana Miroshnik was newly married when she came to Fremont 13 years ago and in the process of getting her Green Card. That marriage and a second marriage failed and then the immigration attorney she was working with dropped the ball in responding to necessary court paperwork.

ICE agents caught up with Miroshnik on May 17, arrested her and the next day arrested Eugene. They have both been ordered to leave the country by June 18 and until that happens, Miroshnik must wear a GPS device on her ankle.

ICE issued a statement on Friday which says: "The cases of these individuals have received extensive review in the nation's courts and all of those enties have found that they have no legal bais to remain in the United States."

Miroshnik realizes that avoiding the court order is a long shot.

"Practically I think only a miracle will reactivate my case or give me extra time," Miroshnik said.

The coalition of people trying to call attention to Miroshnik's case is growing. That's because if she and her son are deported, Miroshink's two American born daughters would stay in the United States and according to Rev. Bruce Green from Centerville Presbyterian Church, the family would be ripped apart.

"We don't really know this is new territory, we really don't know how to pull the levers of influence and power but we are doing our best on every level," he said.

It is that reality that weighs heavily on both Miroshnik and her son.

"The girls, my sisters need their mom. What are they going to do when they are 12 in high school or junior high? I don't know what I am going to do without my sisters," said Eugene.


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