Raves spark concerns among SF officials

May 31, 2010 6:44:28 PM PDT
Drugs are a constant risk at raves. These parties are notorious for drug abuse and sometimes violence and the Cow Palace has hosted this kind of party before.

Politicians in San Francisco want to make sure that parties like this, don't get out of hand.

Saturday's death wasn't the first linked to a rave and San Francisco Board of Supervisors president David Chiu would like to beef up control over the parties.

"Who are the individuals who are promoting these parties? Just so that we know, if something were to happen, who is responsible for this," he said.

In May of 2009, police made nearly 80 arrests and seized 900 ecstasy tablets, as well as LSD, cocaine and methamphetamine at a rave in the Cow Palace.

There is a similar event scheduled for the Regency on Van Ness in just two weeks by a promoter who has had parties at the Cow Palace. And eventhough the venue is a fraction of the size, the concerns around safety remain the same.

"When someone is shot, when neighborhoods have their safety threatened, when people die on the floors of a dance club, that is not acceptable," Chiu said.

Rave parties often last through the night and consist of a variety of loud and fast-paced electronic sound. The popularity of raves is that they're cheap to put on and net the promoter tons of cash in return.

Promoters can be local, national or international and Chiu would like to put an end to the anonymity.

The Regency is just one of several venues throughout San Francisco that has parties, and it's not until something goes wrong that we hear anything about it, and when that happens, politicians believe that someone needs to be held accountable.

"To have successful nightlife, you need a lot of cooperation between the venue and the venue owner," San Francisco Supervisor Bevan Dufty said.

On New Year's Eve 2002, one promoter's rave ended with two dead and seven hospitalized. Dufty says that all parties aren't the same, but all require oversight and need to be out in the open.

"The last thing that I'd want to do is take rave music and drive it more underground than it is already and have events in warehouses where cops are only finding out about it and you have many more problems," he said.


Load Comments