Daily movements to boost your energy

July 13, 2010 4:20:41 PM PDT
Boost your energy level! Implement simple movements into your daily routine to feel energized and refreshed.

We tend to be at our best when are full of energy and are invariably at our worst when we are tired. How do you feel at the end of a long day? Tired, grumpy, distant, etc.

Although we cannot create more time, we can create more energy. For example, good blood circulation is critical for keeping energy levels up. Prolonged periods of sitting compromise our blood circulation by compressing blood vessels - for example, think about how you feel after a long flight or car ride - not very energetic.

Movement, anything from chair stretching to going for a walk, enhances blood circulation and typically increases energy levels. How do you feel when finally get off the plane or get out of the car and stretch your legs and walk around for a minute - energized! Right?

Strategic Movement Exercises

Stretching
Every 30-45 minutes

  1. Neck Tilt Forward
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, slowly tilt your heard forward until your chin touches the top of your chest. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10 - 30 seconds and breathe normally.

  2. Neck Tilt Back
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, slowly tilt your heard backwards. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10-30 seconds and breathe normally.

  3. Reach Forward
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, interlock your fi ngers (palms of hands facing outwards) and slowly extend your arms straight out in front of you. Let the back of the shoulders round slightly as you reach forward. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10 - 30 seconds and breathe normally.

  4. Reach Behind
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, bring your arms behind your back and interlock your fi ngers (palms of the hands facing inwards). Slowly extend your arms behind you.

    Let the chest out and shoulder blades squeeze together as you reach behind. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10-30 seconds and breathe normally.

  5. Flex Foot
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, extend one leg out in front of you and with the heel on the fl oor point the toes upwards. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10 - 30 seconds and breathe normally. Repeat for the opposite foot.

  6. Extend Foot
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, extend one leg out in front of you and with the heel on the fl oor point the toes forwards. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10 - 30 seconds and breathe normally. Repeat for the opposite foot.

  7. Knee to Chest Raise
    Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, lift one knee towards your chest. Stretch to the point of mild discomfort at the most, hold for 10-30 seconds and breathe normally. Repeat for the opposite knee.
Movement for Full Engagement
Small Movements
Every 30-45 minutes
  1. Small Arm Circles Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, extend both arms out to the sides and rotate your arms backwards to make small circles.

  2. Flex and Extend Foot Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, extend one leg out in front of you and with the heel on the fl oor point the toes upwards and then forwards momentarily. Repeat 10 times and then repeat for opposite foot.

  3. Knee to Chest Raises Sitting on the edge of your chair with an upright posture, lift one knee towards your chest, hold momentarily and then lower back to the fl oor. Repeat for the opposite knee and continue to alternate a total of 10 times.
Movement for Full Engagement
Major Movements
Every 90-120 minutes
  1. Stand Up
    When sitting at your desk for extended periods, aim to stand-up from your chair every 90 - 120 minutes, take a deep breath and perform some stretches or small movements.

  2. Walk
    Ideally, stand up, take a deep breath and walk away from your desk, even if just for a moment. For example, stand-up, walk to the window, take a deep breath, stretch and return to your desk. Or, walk to the rest room, break room, to lunch or even another department.

  3. Run Up Stairs
    If time permits, avoid elevators and walk or sprint up a fl ight of stairs. In general, capitalize on any opportunity to take the stairs instead of escalators and elevators.
About the Human Performance Institute:

Through 30 years of experience training elite performers in high-stress situations, such as professional tennis players, Olympians, military Special Forces and heart surgeons, among others, the Human Performance Institute's founders two doctors, Jim Loehr and Jack Groppel, have consistently documented and taught how high levels of energy result in enhanced engagement, improved health and for those in executive positions in business -- the pertinent ability to be a stronger leader.

Alternatively, a lack of energy, often seen as fatigue or stress, undermines and compromises performance and can make people feel disengaged, unproductive and unhappy with how they feel.

The Human Performance Institute believes that successful energy management is contingent on a number of elements working together.

This includes fitness and movement, nutrition, strategic recovery periods and smart sleeping habits, and a focus on a personal mission or goal.

The Human Performance Institute now offers its Corporate Athlete® Course at the Claremont Hotel and Spa in Berkeley. The Corporate Athlete® Course takes a multidisciplinary, science-based approach that combines performance psychology, exercise physiology and nutrition -- all aimed at helping participants be more resilient under periods of stress.

The next Corporate Athlete Course at the Claremont will be September 27-29 and enrollment is open now.

For more information, visit hpinstitute.com

Claremont Hotel Club and Spa
41 Tunnel Road
Berkeley, CA 94705


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