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Foreclosures hit all-time high in US

October 15, 2010 12:56:53 AM PDT
There was an unfortunate record set Thursday concerning foreclosures. There were more in September than any other month in history. This comes as all 50 states are investigating the foreclosure process.

There were 100,000 homes repossessed in September in the U.S. It's one thing when you hear the number, another when you see faces behind it.

Doli Henriquez and her family lost their Newark home last week. Doli and her husband haven't been able to pay the mortgage since she was laid off two years ago.

"Right now I'm feel so sad. I love my house, I live here for seven years, so it's not easy for me," said Henriquez.

They were so reluctant to leave, the family was tossed out through a personal property eviction. Even their belongings from the couch to the kids bicycles were hauled away for the auction block. Doli isn't confident in her English so asked a family friend, Victor Rivas, to help tell the story.

"I feel for them very much, that's why I'm here for them speaking to you," said Rivas.

Their foreclosure comes just as the country hits a new record -- the most foreclosures in one month in history.

It also comes as the country starts to question banks and whether they have cut corners while foreclosing on 3 million homes since 2007.

"Some of the paperwork that's been used to process foreclosure cases, has been outsourced and is being produced in Guam or the Philippines. It's then being e-mailed or shipped overnight and being submitted in courtrooms all across the country," said Matthew Weidner, a mortgage attorney.

Some on Wall Street are pushing back, pointing out the homeowners have no one to blame but themselves saying if they miss their mortgage payments, they shouldn't be in the house. But this family wants everyone to take a hard look at the system, especially the banks.

"If they would stop and just look around to see what they can do to help people make the payments," said Rivas.

The Enriquez's say they tried to modify their loan, but the bank wouldn't work with them. That's a complaint California lawmakers are concerned about, they say it's a common one, and they sent a letter to federal authorities last week pointing out that possibility.


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