Jerry Brown criticized for vacationing in Arizona

November 11, 2010 8:54:08 PM PST
California's next governor was elected only nine days ago and already he is taking flak for his decisions. Before rolling-up his sleeves to work on the transition into office, Jerry Brown is taking a week off. It is not that he is taking a vacation that is drawing heat, but where.

After a long, hard-fought campaign, Governor-elect Jerry Brown said he would take a vacation before tackling the enormous job of fixing the state's problems.

"I am going to take a week off, starting Sunday to Sunday, then I expect to be in Sacramento," he said.

The Sacramento Bee is reporting Brown took his vacation in Arizona, the state that passed a controversial immigration law seen by many, especially Latinos, as racist.

In protest, numerous California communities have voted to boycott Arizona until it rescinds the law.

Brown's campaign staff is not putting out the fire, refusing to confirm or deny that the governor-elect is vacationing in Arizona, saying they are respecting his privacy.

Brown said throughout the campaign he opposes the Arizona law.

At a Mexican-American Veterans Day celebration near the Capitol, there were many Brown supporters. Some thought it was a slap in the face for the new governor to choose Arizona, since Latinos overwhelming supported Brown this election.

Traditionally, the Hispanic voters have supported Jerry Brown, and they certainly helped put him over the top this time," David Pacheco said. "It is offensive. I wouldn't go to Arizona now for anything."

But the Arizona vacation does not bother Assm. Mary Salas, D-Chula Vista.

"To me, I'm not a supporter of a boycott that would be ineffective and does no good," she said. "So if Jerry Brown wants to vacation in Arizona, he deserves it. It was a tough campaign."

A former Meg Whitman strategist thinks Brown should have vacationed somewhere else.

"Why did he go to Arizona especially after he aligned himself with a group of individuals who opposed anyone traveling to Arizona; it's obvious, now that he's got their votes, why does it even matter," Hector Barajas said.

The Arizona law is facing legal challenges; a judge this summer set aside some of the key provisions. As a result, California lawmakers backed off of a statewide boycott of Arizona.


Load Comments