Charges dropped against alleged U-Haul kidnapper

March 24, 2011 1:38:16 PM PDT
The Marin County District Attorney's Office has dismissed charges against a Fairfield woman who was accused of kidnapping several people and locking them in a U-Haul truck.

Deputy District Attorney Linda Witong said the prosecution could not find defendant Lark Ann Freeman's four alleged victims or serve them with subpoenas.

Freeman's preliminary hearing on kidnapping and false imprisonment charges was reset twice, Witong said.

Freeman was arrested Dec. 31 after a National Park Service ranger saw her drive through a red light at the one-way tunnel between Fort Baker and Fort Barry on the way to the Marin Headlands around 9:45 a.m., Golden Gate National Recreation Area spokeswoman Alexandra Picavet said in January.

The ranger tried to stop the U-Haul truck but it kept driving, Picavet said.

The ranger summoned Sausalito police and U.S. Park Police officers and other National Park Service rangers also responded, Picavet said.

Freeman stopped the U-haul on the Bird Island overlook where police inserted triangular blocks of wood at the tires to prevent her from driving away, Picavet said.

A 74-year-old man who was riding in the cab of the truck told Freeman he needed to use the bathroom and contacted park rangers at the scene, Picavet said.

He said Freeman offered him cigarettes and picked him up in People's Park in Berkeley and that there were three other men who were being held against their will in the back of the truck, Picavet said.

The three men in the back of the truck were picked up in Aquatic Park in San Francisco. They said Freeman offered them money to help her move, Picavet said

Tactical teams approached the truck cab and took Freeman into custody after she refused to cooperate with a U.S. Park Police hostage negotiation team, Picavet said.

Freeman said she believed the world was going to end in an earthquake at 11:11 a.m. Friday and she wanted to prepare for it, Picavet said.

In the Marin County jail booking log, Freeman listed her occupation as "Save the World."

Her attorney Beth Wissing-Healy did not return calls for comment.

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