Former aide says she saw trainer inject Bonds

Barry Bonds arrives at the federal courthouse for his perjury trial in San Francisco, Thursday, March 31, 2011. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
March 31, 2011 6:35:09 PM PDT
The prosecution in the Barry Bonds perjury trial is winding down its case. Thursday, one witness helped the government's case, the other hurt it

Bonds' former personal shopper and estranged friend, Kathy Hoskins, was on the stand to testify against him. She was not happy about it. She told the jury that while at Bonds' house helping him pack for a 2002 road trip, she once saw Bonds' then-trainer, Greg Anderson, inject him with something in the belly button area. She said Bonds told her, "That's a little something something when I go on the road. Can't detect it. Can't catch it."

"That's one of the perhaps two or three sentences in this entire case that are potentially direct evidence of the charges," said ABC7 legal analyst Dean Johnson.

Bonds is on trial for telling a 2003 grand jury that he never knowingly took illegal anabolic steroids.

Hoskins' brother Steve was also a prosecution witness; he testified last week. He was Bonds' business manager until the two had a falling out in 2003. Bonds accused him of stealing from him and alerted the FBI.

Thursday Kathy said of her brother, "he threw me under the bus" when he told federal investigators she had seen Anderson inject Bonds. She cried throughout much of her testimony.

Steve told the jury last week about multiple conversations he had about steroids with Bonds' surgeon, Dr. Arthur Ting. But Ting testified that those conversations never happened. He admitted to only one conversation, over the phone, where Steve asked for information about the side effects of anabolic steroids. Ting gave it to him.

However, his testimony was devastating for the prosecution.

"It's no secret that the prosecution's case against Barry Bonds right now is a sinking ship," said Johnson. "It's a circumstantial evidence case, and in any such case you want one piece of evidence that the defense cannot refute. So far we haven't seen that."

The trial resumes Monday with only one prosecution witness left to finish and possibly a few defense witnesses. The jury could begin deliberating sometime next week.


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