Residents worry as PG&E continues pipeline tests

November 7, 2011 6:52:27 PM PST
Sunday's PG&E gas pipeline rupture in Woodside on Sunday has people all along the Peninsula concerned. ABC7 talked with residents in Burlingame about PG&E's inspections there.

A pipeline safety crew out of San Ramon worked on a distribution feeder line on Rollins Road and Toyon Drive in Burlingame for several hours Monday. The line feeds the smaller distribution lines that go into people's homes and businesses.

The line had already been inspected by PG&E several years ago, but the utility company admitted their records on this pipeline were not complete.

"They actually came to us a couple of weeks ago and said, 'You know, we don't actually have to test this line but because we are missing a signature on a record, we want to go ahead and test it,'" Burlingame Mayor Terry Nagel said.

Nagel says she understands why people don't always trust PG&E. For example, neighbors were sent a letter describing the nitrogen pressure test. The project, including closing the hole, was supposed to be completed in two to three days. It's been almost two weeks.

"Oh, it's going to take awhile and you wonder what's going to happen, what's next, right? You get a little worried," business owner Steve Chow said.

PG&E says once they opened up the hole, they decided to perform other tests and that's why it took longer.

"I'm glad that they are because I just want to prevent whatever happened in San Bruno," Burlingame resident Jane Creager said.

Line 132, the pipeline that exploded in San Bruno last year does run through Burlingame, on Skyline Boulevard.

PG&E has checked line 132 through Burlingame. It passed the hydrostatic test with no problem. The report was issued on Oct. 21.

Other cities on the Peninsula are still waiting to have their tests completed.

"I think that everybody who has not gotten the all clear signal on their underground pipeline feels that they have a ticking time bomb under their city and the sooner we can get the reassurance that those lines are safe, the better," Nagel said.


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