Facebook COO Sandberg pens polarizing book

The Cover of "Lean In", a book by Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.
March 11, 2013 8:03:38 PM PDT
She's one of the most powerful women in the world and on Monday Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg released a book on how other women can take steps to succeed in the workplace.

Sandberg is getting a lot this attention for her book called "Lean In." The COO is on the cover of Time magazine and has been a featured guest on "Katie."

The book offers advice to women on climbing the ladder of success.

"No matter how much progress women have made, we're very far from having our share of the leadership roles in any industry, anywhere in our country, or even anywhere in the world," said Sandberg.

Sandberg, 43, is an exception to the rule as a woman in a position of corporate power. Though women attain more than half of today's college degrees, they still make up only about 4% of Fortune 500 CEOs.

She suggests it's because society is still biased against women who take charge.

"We call our daughters bossy; we don't call our sons bossy. We need to change this. We need to look at our daughters and say 'she has executive leadership skills,'" she said.

In her book, Sandberg offers suggestions for women who want to climb the corporate ladder and avoid losing their footing when they decide to start a family.

"Her message is, advance as much as you can so that you can negotiate a position that's favorable to work/family balance when you come to it," Hastings law professor Joan Williams said.

Williams, who studies the balance between work and life, says Sandberg's advice is as sound as the attention she's getting.

"It's reigniting the feminist movement," she said.

But Sandberg's message is also igniting controversy among those who feel the corporate deck is stacked against women.

"Instead of saying 'that doesn't work for women, and it won't work, and let's change the system,' she's kind of going backwards and saying, 'let's change you instead,'" said Lesley Jane Seymour, Editor-in-Chief of More magazine.

Sandberg agrees the rules need to change but she says so do people's attitudes.

"I wrote "Lean In" to try to change the conversation around women from what we can't do to what we can," she said.


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