Porn studio to share space with community center

April 24, 2013 7:01:03 PM PDT
From kinky to kid-friendly, that's the idea behind a plan to use vacant space in an old San Francisco armory in which one business shoots X-rated films. When kink.com first moved into the building back in 2007, there were neighborhood protests. Those have since died down and the company says the new center is sort of a gift to the community.

The historic armory, built in 1914, is now home to kink.com, a video production company specializing in X-rated films. However, G-rated activities will soon take over a vacant section. 40,000 square feet, where soldiers once marched, is being converted into a community center.

"It's not that adult content is our only existence, right? So, this is just another facet, another way for the company to express itself," Andrew Harvill told ABC7 News. He runs the Armory Community Center which has its own entrance, away from the kinky stuff.

On Wednesday, the CHP brought in its canine corps for drills but primarily, it will be a space is for artistic endeavors. Next month, the fortress will be taken over by the American Conservatory Theater which needed a massive area for its production of "Blackwatch" about a legendary regiment of Scottish soldiers. "We looked everywhere. We looked in the East Bay, on the piers, then we found the armory, the drill court. It's like it was made for us," A.C.T Artistic Director Carey Perloff said.

But the Mission Cultural Center doesn't plan to use the armory site, saying that what happens on the other side of the walls runs counter to what they're trying to teach neighborhood kids. "The concern is focusing on the youth and actually developing a positive message that's going to encourage them to look for alternatives other than sex, drugs, and rock and roll," Pedro Reyes said.

The Mission Merchants Association loves the idea of the center. The presidents say they voted 50 votes to none in favor of it. He believes events like the A.C.T production are going to be what he calls "game changers" for the neighborhood.

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