CAL ISO issues Flex Alert as Bay Area temps rise

July 1, 2013 10:09:56 PM PDT
Don't put away those shorts and tank tops quite yet. The National Weather Service is advising Bay Area residents that the hottest day of this heat wave will be Tuesday.

An excessive heat warning is in effect for the region through 7 p.m. Wednesday, with inland temperatures expected to hit between 100 and 110 Monday and Tuesday, hydrologist Mark Strudley said.

As a result, the California Independent System Operator has issued a Flex Alert for Northern California for Monday and Tuesday, and is asking consumers to reduce their energy use because of anticipated high demand.

The demand is expected to be especially high between noon and 7 p.m., when scorching temperatures will result in the increased use of air conditioners.

Energy demand is expected to peak at about 48,300 megawatts around 4:30 p.m. Monday, and at roughly 47,808 megawatts on Tuesday, California ISO officials said. The ISO controls the state's power grid.

According to Strudley, Livermore will be one of the hottest spots in Bay Area, but parts of the South Bay including Gilroy and San Jose are also poised to reach the triple digits. He says hot zones will also include other cities in the East Bay, such as Richmond, as well as much of Napa and Sonoma counties.

Those wishing to escape the scorching heat may want to head to the beach. Strudley says there will be "cooler areas as you get closer to the coast."

A regional cool-off is not expected until Friday, meaning the Fourth of July holiday will still be toasty.

He said the good news is that fog is unlikely to obstruct views of fireworks shows, noting that there was some marine layer seen along the coast Sunday night but fog is likely to be minimal the rest of the week.

Local emergency responders have reminded beachgoers to use caution around the water, especially after two women drowned in the ocean north of Santa Cruz on Sunday.

Updated information on energy use and supply is available at www.caiso.com.

(ABC7 News contributed to this report)


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