Silicon Valley man sheds light on Egypt's crises

July 4, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
Egypt's new interim president is promising new elections and paying tribute to the protesters who helped bring him to power.

The supreme justice of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court, Adly Mansour, was sworn in as the nation's interim president on Thursday, replacing President Mohammed Morsi who was ousted by the military and placed under house arrest.

President Obama met with his national security team Thursday to discuss the situation in Egypt.

Dr. Ossama Hassanein's Silicon Valley office is a long way from Cairo, but his heart is there with the people in Tahrir Square and he talks frequently with family who still live there.

Hassanein says he and his family feel the people's movement to remove Morsi is the first big step in the right direction.

"A great deal of optimism, of joy, a feeling that we've regained our country and the best is yet to come," Hassanein said.

Morsi's removal has been called a coup d'etat by some, but Hassanein is adamant the change is coming from the people, not from the military.

"The representation that what has happened is a coup d'etat by the army is completely false. For the first time in history, we have seen not people lining up to applaud the army on parades, but the army lining up to protect the people on parade," Hassanein said.

Hassanein is involved in a start-up incubator at the University of Cairo, called Smart Village. It's been on hold for the last two years and just re-opened in June, which is perfect timing to capitalize on the changes he believes are coming.

He is not worried that another election will produce another Morsi. The current list of candidates includes what he calls extraordinary people.

"The latest is in fact the man who used to be the governor of the central bank of Egypt, P.H.D from Wharton with the bank of New York, experience in Wall Street, during the good times," Hassanein said.

He says the Egyptian people want what the rest of the world wants: Social justice, economic and educational opportunities, peace at home, peace abroad. And now, they just might get it.


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