7 On Your Side looks at possible solution to car hacking

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There are new instances of car hacking and a local company that says it has a solution. This comes at a time when many car makers still don't believe it is much of a problem. (KGO-TV)

There are new instances of car hacking and a local company that says it has a solution. This comes at a time when many car makers still don't believe it is much of a problem.

7 On Your Side's Michael Finney has been investigating car hacking for three years and he has an important update.

A security camera shows a vehicle driving down a San Francisco street at night with a person perched on the window sill. The vehicle slows down as it approaches the parked SUV, and suddenly the interior of the SUV lights up.

The window sitter scrambles out of his or her car and into the now unlocked SUV. The video is showing a car hacking. The video shows the thief digging through the center console looking for valuables.

This car belongs to a guy we'll call Rich.

"I think they have learned how to hack the cars and yhey are going on a scavenger hunt," Rich said.

Michael Finney first reported about car hacking three years ago when hackers were caught on camera in Southern California.

Since then, through a series of reports, Finney has shown car hackers doing their dirty work in the Bay Area and across the country.

Surprisingly, law enforcement has never confiscated one of the electronic hacking devices from a criminal and that has lead to a debate: Do the devices really exist?

Peter Yorke is CEO of Voyomotive. "It very clearly is a problem the police are now aware of this and the car companies are always the last one to acknowledge that there is in fact a problem and part of it is because they have no defense right now," Yorke said.

Yorke doesn't have one of the hacking devices either, but says he has something better, a solution.

The Voyo device plugs into the on-board diagnostics port located under a car's dash. It is paired with an app downloaded to a smartphone. When a hacker targets a car the horn blares and the lights flash.

If the doors are unlocked, Voyo will relock the doors.

Again and again. To override the Voyo a cellphone must be present and connected by Bluetooth. And if you want to pay a bit more you can get an additional under-the-hood device that keeps the car from starting.

That's all nice, but begs the question that these high tech thieves just hack the Voyo device too?

Finney: "Why can't they disable yours along with all the others?

Yorke: Because they're going to need your cellphone to break our encryption. To do that we use something called two-factor authentication and unless your cellphone is in the car, even if you have the keys to your car, you're still going to trigger the alarm, you're still going to re-lock the doors and you still will not be able to start the engine of the car.

The Voyo sells for $100 and is available for pre-orders now. It is expected to ship within 60 days.
Related Topics:
business7 On Your Sideconsumerconsumer concernsparentingcarcar theftapphacking
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