Both parties court the Latino vote ahead of elections

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In California, as well as in several battleground states, the turnout of Latino voters may play a key role.

Volunteers are on their cell phones, urging voters in Spanish to go to the polls. It's a test of the power of persuasion.

Sitting among them is Tom Steyer, the billionaire San Franciscan who has pumped nearly $40 million into ballot issues. He is adamant that Latino turnout be strong.

MORE: Find in-depth information about what's on your ballot this election

"Having fair representation of Latino voters tomorrow is absolutely essential both to a good outcome but more than that, to a fair and just democracy," said Steyer.

In California, as well as in several battleground states, the turnout of Latino voters may play a key role.

RELATED: Big early voting numbers in Bay Area ahead of election

Another issue important to Latino voters prompted two low-wage, fast food workers to show up at the San Jose Silicon Valley Chamber of Commerce. They're at odds over San Jose Measure E, which would force employers to give part-timers full-time work, rather than add more part-timers.

"We expect with the early voting by Latinos across the country and the aggressive ground campaign that we're doing for Latino participation... we are not partisan. We're simply trying top get the issues discussed," said Fr. Jon Pedigo at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church.
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The chamber's CEO sees the presidential race being the main draw for Latino voters.

"You have a national candidate who has enraged them and rightfully so. They're going to turn out, and they're going to vote. It's going to be a difference maker in the election," said Matt Mahood, the CEO of the San Jose Chamber.

Research indicates Latino voters are one-third liberal, one-third moderate and one-third conservative. The captain of the Santa Clara County Trump Campaign says she sees Latino support.

"I have had many Latinos come up to me, give me hugs, give me kisses on the cheek, saying thanks so much for all you're doing. I've also had whites, I've had blacks, African Americans, all nationalities," explained Kim Womack.

For full coverage on the presidential election, click here.
Related Topics:
politics2016 electionelection dayhillary clintondonald trumpu.s. & worldlatino lifediversitycivil rightsSan Jose
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