Millennium Tower residents feel 'mugged' by developers after sinking fiasco

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Some residents of the sinking Millennium Tower in San Francisco have decided to boycott paying property taxes, because they say the city covered up problems with the high-rise. (KGO-TV)

Some residents of the sinking Millennium Tower in San Francisco have decided to boycott paying property taxes, because they say the city covered up problems with the high-rise.

Jerry and Pat Dodson became activists when everyone learned that the tower was sinking at an unexpected rate.
FULL VIDEO: San Francisco sues Millennium Tower developer

They did their research. Jerry Dodson is a lawyer and spoke up at meetings and hearings.

They haven't filed a lawsuit against the developer yet, but they are taking action against the city. And other residents are following their lead.

The Dodsons live on the 42nd floor of the Millennium Tower, a luxury two bedroom condo with killer views.
Last September, the Dodsons and some 50 other homeowners asked city assessor Carmen Chu to lower their property taxes because the high-rise had unexpectedly sunk 16 inches and tilted two inches.

The Dodsons paid $2.1 million for their condo three years ago. They told the assessor the value they believe is now around $400,000.

RELATED: Reports say tilting Millennium Tower in SF can withstand quake

"Some people put zero, some put a dollar. If you're unable to sell something, it's hard to believe it has any value at the time," Pat Dodson said.

They have yet to hear from the assessors office. Currently, two homeowners' lawsuits are pending against the developers.
The Dodsons are now considering their own legal action against them.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin has held hearings which he says also reveal the city's building inspection department knew about the unexpected settling problems even before units were sold, but gave developers the green light anyway.

Because of that, the Dodsons have decided to withhold paying their property taxes to the city.

"It's like being mugged," Pat Dodson said . "If two people mugged you. In this case, it's millennium tower and the city. I'm not sure the victim is supposed to pay the mugger. I think someone has to take a stand and hold the city responsible."

RELATED: Developer knew about Millennium Tower sinking

The Dodsons say they're more than happy to pay their property taxes once the city takes responsibility and the tower is repaired.
Related Topics:
realestatelawsuitfrauddennis herrerarental propertyrentershousingconstructionlawssan francisco board of supervisorsunstable buildingmillennium towerSan FranciscoSouth of Market
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