Airline industry ramps up damage control efforts after United incident

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Some major U.S. airlines are ramping up efforts for damage control in the wake of a controversy last week, in which a man was dragged off an overbooked United flight. (KGO-TV)

Some major U.S. airlines are changing the way they do business in the wake of the United controversy last week. And it could mean more money in your pocket if they change your seat.

Three major carriers - Delta, American, and United - are changing their policies after a confrontation last Sunday in which a man was dragged off an overbooked United flight.

VIDEO: United passenger dragged off overbooked flight at O'Hare; officer placed on leave

The fallout led to an uproar and has some people calling for changes to the way airlines do business.

Again, three airlines have responded with more passenger friendly policies.



American now guarantees that if you are on board a plane, you cannot get removed for someone else to take your seat.

United now requires employees to book a seat at least an hour before takeoff.

And Delta upped its compensation to passengers bumped off flights from $1,350 to almost $10,000. The airline is now willing to pay up to $9,950 for you to give up your seat on an overbooked flight.

RELATED: Bay Area groups accuse United of racial discrimination

"Money talks," said Delta Airlines passenger Peter Zajonc. "I think that when you travel you don't have much choice but if you're not offering money it makes it unfair to passengers."

Some politicians and consumer advocates are questioning the industry standard practice of overbooking flights.

So far, no airlines have responded to that.

Click here for more stories, photos, and video on United Airlines.
Related Topics:
travelUnited Airlinesair travelconsumerconsumer concernsu.s. & worldairline industrydeltaamerican airlinesChicagoSan FranciscoSan Francisco International Airport
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