Boston funding news: Cloud storage, medical tech, and robotic restaurants top recent investments

Photo: Spyce Kitchen

Boston-based cloud storage startup Wasabi Technologies, Inc secured $68 million in Series B financing last month, according to company database Crunchbase, leading the city's funding headlines in September. The Sept. 12 Forestay Capital investment was just one of several successful funding rounds for Beantown-based companies last month.

Boston's second-largest funding round went to Beta Bionics, the developer of the world's first fully integrated bionic pancreas. The company secured $50 million last month in series B funding from Eventide Asset Management, following FDA approval in May that allows home-use studies for adults and children with type 1 diabetes.

It's not the only medical device company to land new financing in September: Miach Orthopedics, a knee repair technology company, secured $22.5 million from the National Football League Players Association on Sept. 17.

In the food and beverage arena, Sept. 7 saw Spyce Food receive a $21 million Series A round from Collaborative Fund. Spyce Food, which describes itself as "an original restaurant concept featuring a never-before-seen robotic kitchen." Spyce, which Bostonians may know as a fast-casual restaurant in Downtown Crossing, will use the funds to expand its concept with new East Coast locations.

Additional noteworthy funding events from last month include $20 million in series B funding for Mabl, "the leading SaaS provider for machine learning based test automation"; $9 million in series B funding for Nanoview Biosciences, which is "developing proprietary products that support research, translation and delivery of precision medicine"; and $6.6 million in funding for HqO, the designers of an application that "makes it easy to chat with your closest business contacts and connect with new partners."

Hoodline offers data-driven analysis of local happenings and trends across cities. Links included in the articles may earn Hoodline a commission on clicks and transactions.
Related Topics:
businessHoodlineSan Francisco