Toys help kids dive into augmented reality

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The latest innovation in high tech toys is giving children an early dose of augmented reality. We wanted to find out if AR can really work to educate our children. So we turned to the teachers and kids at the Coder School in San Francisco. (KGO-TV)

The latest innovation in high tech toys is giving children an early dose of augmented reality. We wanted to find out if AR can really work to educate our children. So we turned to the teachers and kids at the Coder School in San Francisco.

You might be surprised to learn kids can learn from wearing a t-shirt.

The fascination on everyone's faces tells the story.

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Children point their camera on the Virtuali-Tee and within minutes, a dose of augmented reality gives them a simulated look at the organs in their bodies.

"I think it makes the classroom experience a little more interesting rather than flat & dry," said Allen Kwan of the Coder School.

"There it is," said Kwan while looking at his tablet. "Let's see what we want to explore."

Kids are also learning building circuits can be fun.

"It's like play," said 7-year-old Tyler Shen.

"It was pretty cool," said Aiden Liu, 9.

Pai Technology's Circuit Conductor walks kids through the process of building the circuit.

Once completed, they can scan the objects into an app.

Students are rewarded when they see the free flow of electricity and light at play.

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"Simple how a circuit works," said Michael Phan of the Coder School to his young students. "Right? Battery connecting to light. Then a light has to connect back to the battery. So now it's powering a source."

Phan suggests a teacher or parent work with the children to explain the concepts.

STEM, of course, isn't just for the guys.

Look at these future scientists and engineers playing with Augie the Robot.

These girls are learning to code while at the same time playing with Augie.

First they just get used to the controls.

Then they use code to program the robots to do various maneuvers.

"I mean It kind of gets students really passionate about programming once you start seeing robots involved," said Kwan.

He thinks the $200 price tag is a bit on the pricey side.

But don't tell that to these girls.

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