5 facts about daylight saving time

EMBED </>More Videos

A visitor leans over the railing on the fourth floor of the rotunda in the Texas Capitol, the highest floor open to the general public, to take a photo, Thursday, June 18, 2015.

As the saying goes, it's just about time to "fall back." This weekend, we'll be turning our clocks back as daylight saving time ends for the year.
So set a reminder for 2 a.m. Sunday and then check out five fast facts about daylight saving time.
  1. It's daylight saving time, no "s." (Because we're saving daylight.)

  2. By act of Congress, beginning in 2007, daylight saving time begins in the United States on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November.

  3. Every state in the U.S. observes daylight saving time except for Hawaii and most of Arizona. The American territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands also do not observe daylight saving time.

  4. The most recent state to change its daylight time policy was Indiana, which adopted the use of daylight time state-wide in 2006.

  5. Don't worry, we'll be "springing ahead" in just a few months. Next year's daylight saving time begins on March 13.

Related Topics:
societynationalu.s. & worlddaylight saving timewatercooler

Load Comments