2018 VOTER GUIDE: A look at California's Prop 2

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In the November election, California voters will decide on 11 propositions. Here's everything you need to know about Prop 2. (Courtesy of CALmatters.org)

In the November election, California voters decided on 11 propositions.

Prop 2 passed, here's everything you need to know about the proposition.

<-- BACK to all propositions

>>> California and Bay Area election results here

>>> National election results here

PROP 2:

Authorizes bonds to fund existing housing program for individuals with mental illness. Legislative statute.

SUMMARY:

A "Yes" vote allows the State to spend Proposition 63 (known as the Mental Health Services Act) tax revenue on $2 Billion in bonds for housing people in need of mental health services.

BACKGROUND ON MILLIONAIRE'S TAX:

In 2004, California voters passed Proposition 63. It levied an additional 1% tax on incomes above $1 Million to finance mental health programs.

HOW DID IT GET ON MY BALLOT:

Usually revenue bonds do *not* require the approval of voters to take effect. However, because Proposition 2 asks to spend revenue from an existing ballot measure, Proposition 63, it must go before voters.

Proposition 2 received 35 votes (20 needed) in the State Assembly and 72 (41 needed) in the State Senate before Governor Brown signed a bill to make it a ballot measure.

MAJOR BACKERS:

Chan Zuckerberg Advocacy, Members' Voice of the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California, Housing Trust Silicon Valley, Mid-Peninsula Housing Corporation.*

MAJOR OPPONENTS:

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Contra Costa authored the official argument against Proposition 2. That organization call Proposition 2 "The Bureaucrat and Developer Enrichment Act."

IMPACT TO TAXPAYERS:

Money would come from the existing "Millionaire's Tax" as opposed to the wider revenue stream affecting all taxpayers.

*NOTE: All information regarding donations as backers or opponents of a ballot measure reflects financial disclosures made to California's Secretary of State as of September 7, 2018.

LEARN MORE: CALmatters is a nonpartisan, nonprofit journalism venture committed to explaining how California's state Capitol works and why it matters. Check out the CALmatters 2018 Election Guide.

Take a look at full coverage on the 2018 election here.
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