Rep. Khanna condemns Pelosi attack, says any threats of political violence are 'unpatriotic'

ByTim Johns via KGO logo
Wednesday, November 2, 2022
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Rep. Ro Khanna is calling for the divisiveness to stop in wake of Paul Pelosi's attack, saying any political threat is not the American way.

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As the dust settles after the horrific attack on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband, Paul, last Friday, calls for change continue to grow.

One of the loudest voices, coming from South Bay Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) who's called the attack personal.

RELATED: Paul Pelosi attack suspect was on 'suicide mission,' planned to target other politicians: Report

"In the Bay Area, we're a tight-knit family, and there are many times I have visited Pelosi's home," Khanna said.

Data from the U.S. Capitol Police Threat Assessment Team shows that threats against lawmakers have more than doubled since 2017.

Some, like Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.), have been very open about ongoing threats to not just themselves, but also their families.

VIDEO: 'Cut his kids' heads off:' Rep. Eric Swalwell receiving threats after FBI's Mar-a-Lago raid

Following Pelosi's attack, local leaders say the divisiveness needs to stop.

"We need to lower the temperature in this country and speak out against any threats of political violence. It's not the American way. It's unpatriotic," Khanna said.

And it's not just national-level politicians who have been the targets of threats or harassment.

"I've had you know, of course, protestors in front of my home and including someone who walked around with a pitchfork. A big one that could have been used as a weapon," said San Francisco Mayor London Breed.

RELATED: Data shows threats against lawmakers intensifying, more than doubled since 2017

Breed stopped by the ABC7 News studio Tuesday.

She says city officials are working closely with federal partners to ensure that the suspect in the Pelosi attack is brought to justice.

"People who are elected officials should not live in fear of their lives for what it is they say or they do in this capacity," Breed said.

And while the country remains largely divided, Khanna says immediate steps need to be taken.

"It's probably impractical to have that kind of security for 535 members of Congress and the Senate. There though, there should be assessments of residences to make sure they're safe," he said.

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