Sonoma County estimates $155M in flood damages after massive storm

SANTA ROSA, Calif. (KGO) -- After a major storm caused mass flooding in the North Bay, Sonoma County officials are estimating $155 million in damages.

The extreme Russian River flooding was so bad, Governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency on Feb. 28.



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This allowed Sonoma County to access state resources and mutual aid to assist in recovery efforts, county officials said.

"Once the floodwaters receded, county staff began conducting damage assessments on the estimated 2,600 properties that were inundated by flooding," officials said.

There was also a flyover assessment to document preliminary damage across the county.

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"These initial assessments estimate approximately $155 million in damages countywide, including approximately 1,900 homes (1,760 with major damage), and 578 businesses," the county said in a statement.

READ THE ENTIRE PRESS RELEASE FROM SONOMA COUNTY:


The County of Sonoma continues to respond swiftly to the recent extreme rainfall and flooding of the Russian River. Working closely with local, state, and federal partners, the county has worked around-the-clock to clear roadways, help those who were trapped in their homes, and coordinate shelter for those in need. Once the floodwaters receded, county staff began conducting damage assessments on the estimated 2,600 properties that were inundated by flooding. Emergency response staff and elected officials, also conducted a flyover assessment, documenting preliminary widespread damage across the County. These initial assessments estimate approximately $155 million in damages countywide, including approximately 1,900 homes (1,760 with major damage), and 578 businesses.
"I am proud of our county's immediate response to the flooding," said Sonoma County Board of Supervisors Chair David Rabbitt. "Working as a team during this event, the emergency operations staff closely monitored the weather forecast, fielded emergency calls, dispatched crews to assist in rescues, began road clearing operations, and coordinated public safety to keep citizens safe."

On February 26, the Board of Supervisors declared a local emergency proclamation and requested assistance from the state. Governor Newsom responded to this request and declared a state of emergency on February 28, which allows Sonoma County to access state resources and mutual aid to assist in recovery efforts.
"This is a heartbreaking time for our community," said Fifth District Supervisor Lynda Hopkins, whose district was hit hardest by the flooding. "We appreciate everyone's patience as we all work together to help our community recover. We've done it before and we can do it again."
For current emergency information, please visit www.socoemergency.org.


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