'Demon behavior': Bay Area community leaders call for unity, justice in wake of Buffalo attack

"African American humanity has been assaulted, insulted, vandalized, and almost rendered to be less than human"

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Tuesday, May 17, 2022
Local community leaders call for unity in wake of Buffalo attack
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Those in San Francisco's religious community and city leaders are speaking out about what is now being called a 'hate crime shooting.'

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Bay Area community leaders are reacting to the shooting in Buffalo that killed 10.

Those in San Francisco's religious community and city leaders spoke out tonight about what is now being called a 'hate crime shooting.'

"African American humanity has been assaulted, insulted, vandalized, and almost rendered to be less than human," said Reverend Amos Brown of San Francisco's Third Baptist Church and NAACP. Brown spoke out Monday about the shooting in Buffalo, New York. One that authorities call a "racially motivated hate crime."

"And we in San Francisco acknowledge that this city is not immune from the same violence," said Brown.

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But Reverend Brown was not alone.

"We must denounce this demon behavior," said one person who spoke Monday night.

He was joined by both religious and community leaders from San Francisco and Oakland in a call for unity and justice.

"We have to be here because we have to support our brothers and sisters from the Black community. It is not acceptable, it is quite upsetting to see our brothers and sisters being killed and hunted down," said Carl Chan of the Oakland Chinatown Chamber of Commerce.

In fact Reverend Leroy Adams from San Francisco's Providence Baptist Church spoke of his personal connection to his hometown of Buffalo and the supermarket where this happened.

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"I'm grateful that my mother was not there at again that particular grocery store on Saturday, she does go there several times but just this Saturday she was not able to make it," said Rev. Leroy Adams, Jr.

San Francisco Undersheriff Joseph Engler spoke of a nationwide meeting that was held Monday among law enforcement agencies across the country.

"One thing I was impressed upon this morning was the call to not let this pattern occur again. This is not business as usual, everyone's attention is had right now," said San Francisco Undersheriff Joseph Engler.

"I may not sound like it but I believe what Bishop Desmond Tutu said when he was asked 'Bishop are you hopeful that things will get better' and he looked at them and smiled with that beautiful accent and said, 'young man as a Christian I am a prisoner of hope,'" said another pastor.

On Wednesday this week, there will be rallies and vigils in remembrance of those who lost their life to be held outside both Oakland City Hall and San Francisco City Hall.

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