• BREAKING NEWS SF police continue search after cop hurt in hit-and-run
  • BREAKING NEWS Police hold update on San Francisco officer hit by a car--- WATCH LIVE
  • BREAKING NEWS Police hold update on San Francisco officer hit by a car--- WATCH LIVE

UC Berkeley student diagnosed with measles

EMBED </>More Videos

A University of California at Berkeley student with the measles rode on public transit and spent time on campus before diagnosed. (KGO-TV )

A highly contagious University of California Berkeley student is infected with measles and may have exposed other people.

The search is now on for anyone who may have been exposed to the virus.

AC transit bus rider Sierra Fryberger just found out a passenger was highly contagious with measles while riding the bus.

"It's close quarters and it's highly contagious. I think it's pretty terrifying," Fryberger said.

Public health officials say on Monday, Aug. 24 the infected UC Berkeley student left campus around 3:30 p.m. on AC Transit bus route 25A. The student returned to campus on the same route around 5:30 p.m. The measles virus is highly infectious and can linger in the air for up to two hours.

"I feel safe. I've gotten the vaccine. But there are a lot of people who haven't been and others who can't be yet, like little kids, babies who are going to be more susceptible to that," Cal student Benjamin Epstein said.

The infected student's whereabouts were documented on the day the student rode the AC Transit bus to UC Berkeley. The student continued exposing people for five more days until finally being placed into isolation.

Health officials are now tracking down people who were possibly exposed and encouraging others to get the measles vaccine, which protects 99 percent of people exposed to the virus.

Symptoms develop anywhere from seven to 21 days after exposure and include fever and a facial rash.

Those at highest risk from measles are the unvaccinated, infants, pregnant women and those with impaired immunity. Those who have had the recommended two doses of the MMR vaccine are at very low risk, officials said.

Related Topics:
healthcollege studentUC Berkeleyillnessac transitBARTvaccinesBerkeley
(Copyright ©2017 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.)

Load Comments