Stanford students plan to protest sex assault at Sunday's graduation ceremony

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Anger over Brock Turner's six month sentence for sex assault will be front and center at Sunday's graduation ceremony at Stanford University. (KGO-TV)

Anger over Brock Turner's six month sentence for sex assault will be front and center at Sunday's graduation ceremony at Stanford University.

Students are staging a protest against rape culture. Their message: protect survivors, not rapists.

RELATED: Prosecution memo stresses Brock Turner had history of harassing women

A graduation tradition at Stanford University is the non-traditional start to the ceremony -- the wacky walk. A video from 2005 shows students decking themselves out in costumes. This year, many will be holding signs with a powerful message.

Violet Trachtenberg is one of the organizers of the wacky walk protest. It's in response to the Brock Turner sexual assault case and rape culture, which she says is a big problem on college campuses.

RELATED: Congress to read letter by Stanford sexual assault victim

"I will say one of the signs we have is, 'How will you teach your son not to rape?'" Trachtenberg said. "I think it shows how many seniors are supportive of standing in solidarity with survivors of sexual assault."

One advocacy group took out a full page ad in the student newspaper. It congratulates the class of 2016 and asks the community to take a stand against rape culture.

RELATED: Key witness in Stanford sexual assault case speaks out

That same group plans to fly a banner overhead Sunday's ceremony with the message, "Persky must go," showing their outrage to the judge in the case.

RELATED: Brock Turner's hometown in Ohio reacts to sentence

Petition organizers delivered nearly 1 million signatures to a judicial oversight group Friday, demanding his removal for giving Turner, what many consider, a light sentence for his crime -- just six months.

"It's a pretty high bar for this commission to remove a sitting judge," said ABC7 News legal analyst. "It really has to be misconduct. And here you got a judge who imposed a sentence that may well have been the wrong sentence to impose, but it's a sentence that the probation department itself recommended."

Click here for full coverage on the Brock Turner case.
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newsBrock Turnersex crimesex assaultcrimeStanford UniversitySan Francisco
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