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Large electronics banned on flights to U.S. from certain Middle Eastern airports

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According to the Associated Press, certain airlines will not allow passengers to use electronic devices on board as of midnight Monday. Some passengers at SFO had differing opinions on the legitimacy of the ban. (KGO-TV)

Sources close to Homeland Security say laptops, cameras and more electronic devices will not be allowed on some flights. According to the Associated Press, certain airlines will not allow passengers to use electronic devices on board as of midnight Monday.

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The ban applies to nonstop flights to the United States from 10 international airports including; Cairo, Egypt, Amman, Jordan, Kuwait City, Casablanca, Morocco, Doha, Qatar, Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia, Istanbul, Turkey and Abu Daubi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.

No tablets, no laptop computers, no cameras, games or DVD players will be permitted under this ban.

Travelers at SFO, who just arrived from Istanbul shared their opinions.

"With those belongings, I feel like you want them to be close to you at all times," said San Francisco resident Emily Spiegel. "Just having them checked is just going to be another concern for people."

A bomb in a laptop blew a hole in a Somali jetliner in Feb. 2016, which is also a concern.

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A senior fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution says electronics on airplanes is an established security problem. "Maybe they don't trust the scanning devices in those particular airports. I was thinking that might be part of the problem," said Abraham Soafer.

Many travelers say it would be a big inconvenience.

"Not having my computer, not having things to write on, not having a large book to read -- I would really have to rethink traveling to those countries," said Palo Alto resident Raj Oza.

One man said he'd be okay with checking his computer for safety's sake.

"If there's concerns, I understand. We have to rely on the people who know what's going on and you have to trust them," said Kamal Fallaha of San Carlos.

A Homeland Security spokesperson told ABC7 News the department won't comment on potential security precautions.

Click here for more of ABC7 News' stories, photos, and video on immigration.

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politicstravelair traveltravel tipsimmigrationimmigration reformdepartment of homeland securityterrorismterror threatu.s. & worldmiddle eastSan Francisco
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