NASA says land sinking in CA due to groundwater pumping

This July 23, 2015 photo of the Russell Avenue Bridge in Firebaugh, Calif. shows the drought has caused the bridge to sink. (Florence Low/ California Department of Water Resources via AP)

New research by NASA scientist shows vast areas of California's Central Valley are sinking faster than previously thought as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought.

The research released Wednesday says that in some places the ground is sinking nearly two inches a month.

Mark Cowin, head of the California Department of Water Resources, says the sinking land is causing costly damage to major canals that deliver water up and down the state.

The report says land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months and part of the California Aqueduct has sunk eight inches in four months last year.

To learn how much water your city is required to cut back, click here. For water rebate information from Bay Area water suppliers, click here. You'll find tips about how to conserve water here and information on how to to report water wasters #WhereYouLive, here.

For full coverage on the drought, click here.
Related Topics:
droughtcaliforniacalifornia wateru.s. & worldcentral valleycalifornia department of fish and wildlifecalifornia legislationjerry brownwater conservationwater
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