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Woman devotes time to saving pets

June 27, 2008 7:24:53 PM PDT
A San Francisco woman is helping to bring people and pets together, across international borders. Her work is making life better for both the animals and the humans.

Vicky Lynn shows off her latest charge, 4-year-old Willow from Willets. Willow's profile is also online -- at Lynn's Asians For Animals And Nature, or "AHAN" Web site.

Lynn is taking care of Willow until the right adoption match is made.

"He doesn't bark, he doesn't chew on things when you're not home. He gets along with everybody. Anybody who has him is going to be very, very lucky," said Lynn.

Since Lynn founded AHAN in 1994, thousands of animals have been saved from neglect or death when rescued by a wide net of volunteers from Willets to Taiwan.

Dogs and cats have found new homes through AHAN, and families have found their new best friend.

Nine-month old Taipei was adopted by the Georgetti-Stein family in Redwood City last fall. She was part of a litter of dogs found abandoned in a Taiwan forest.

"She was a $200 dog, the same cost as the local SPCA. She came with all her shots, spayed, micro-chipped, same as if you went to the SPCA only difference was my kids and husband went to pick her up at San Francisco International instead of the pound," said Taipei's owner Dianne Georgetti.

"I run around in the back yard and have her chase me sometimes. I throw the ball for her. I do a lot," said 9-year-old Paige Stein.

"When I didn't know about dogs I thought it would be better when it's pure-bred, but now it's just I don't think it's much of a difference," said 10-year-old Tristan Stein.

Lynn says she discovered her profound love of animals suddenly and somewhat by accident.

About 25-years ago, her son gave her a rescued kitten named Bubbles. But the kitten was sick and died in her arms three months later.

"Bubbles death opened my eyes and my heart to all the animals that are suffering in this world. So I started to do some volunteer work and help find abandoned animals a good home," said Lynn.

Lynn runs AHAN out of her Richmond District home. From there, she reaches out across the world.

"As long as people call us, if we have the resources we will try to help. It doesn't matter where they're from. To us, we shouldn't set a geography where the animal we should help, where we shouldn't. That's my philosophy," said Lynn.

ABC7 Salutes Vicky Lynn and all the volunteers at AHAN.


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