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3D sports broadcasts hitting markets nationwide

September 6, 2010 7:09:12 PM PDT
The first collegiate football game televised in 3D was aired Monday night. The Boise State vs. Virginia Tech game gave viewers a glimpse into the future and the temptation to consider buying a 3D television.

3D actually really makes the game action a lot more exciting. At Ricky's in San Leandro, customers can get their first taste of 3D TV. In recent weeks, they have seen the Masters, World Cup soccer, the U.S. Open, and now college football. It is whole new ballgame for home viewing.

The glasses viewers have to wear are not the most stylish glasses, but they are definitely the newest status symbol.

Ricky's Sports Theatre and Grill got its 3D TV set six months ago.

"The perspective is so great. It's like you're right there. You can reach out and touch somebody," say owner Ricky Ricardo Sr.

That is just what we caught one customer trying to do. Sporting events are clearly stimulating 3D TV set sales. Best Buy says four companies are making them including LG, Panasonic, Samsung and Sony. The screens range from 42 to 55 inches and a 3D set, 3D DVD player and surround sound system can run from $2,000 to $6,000.

"The content is slim, but the really awesome thing is that with all of your 3D TVs, you can see your 2D action as well," says Dallas Carter at Best Buy. "So, all of your Blu-Ray movies and your standard definition movies can also be viewed on your 3D TV."

Special 3D glasses also add to the cost. They run from $100 to $150. One comes with a set, so you have to buy additional ones for family and guests. 3D glasses from movie theaters, by the way, will not work with TV.

3D TV's make up only 1.4 percent of all TV set sales right now, but they are expected to reach almost 40 percent in four years. While they wow first-time viewers, some say they will postpone taking the plunge.

"We just saw it here. It's just the beginning of it. Every year they come out, every six months, like a cell phone. They upgrade it," says Tony Ferrera of San Mateo. "Just give it some time."

Ferrera may be right. Some technical standards have not been adopted universally. For example, one brand of 3D glasses may not work properly with a competing brand. Then, there are people like Ramon Barrientos who told ABC 7, "I'd love to have this at home."

He sat down to watch a 3D movie at Best Buy.

"Real clear... It's almost as if you're in it, like right there, the shot in the living room, everything stands out. It's real vivid," he says.

Next weekend, the consumer electronics industry will be having a national 3D TV promotion. Many stores will be participating to give people a chance to experience 3D TV.

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