• WEATHER ALERT Winter Weather Advisory

PG&E gives customers access to pipeline maps

October 4, 2010 7:44:11 PM PDT
PG&E customers have a new way to find out if they live near a major gas pipeline. In response to the fatal San Bruno explosion, PG&E is making basic neighborhood maps available.

Flags and bright orange tubes mark the route of PG&E's failed 30-inch gas transmission line No. 132.

At one location, it skirts within feet of San Bruno's John Muir Elementary School. The principal did not know if there was gas in the line Monday. PG&E says it has been empty since the Sept. 9 explosion just down the road from the school.

Before now, neighbors would have had no way of knowing the line was there, but now any PG&E customer with an online account can see a basic map of lines within two miles of their home.

"It's a little bit of a scale that's, you know, not completely fine detail; that's information we're sharing with emergency responders and city officials, but certainly it gives our customers a good sense if they live near a pipeline," PG&E spokesperson Matt Nauman said.

All across San Bruno, the pipeline's path is marked along the streets. PG&E is getting ready to lower a camera into the line.

On Catalpa Way and Fleetwood Drive, where line No. 132 travels underneath a playground and a basketball court, crews are digging for an access point for the camera.

Rhonda Boone was home the night of the explosion.

"I think it should be moved, unless they can guarantee it is safe; they're making me nervous working on it right now," she said.

The camera will travel the pipeline from a valve station on the south, roughly across Skyline from John Muir Elementary to a valve station on the north on the 1400 block of Crestwood Drive, where 132 and another line converge just west of Highway 280.

Jose Imperio lives there; his house is bordered on two sides by pipelines. He has been having trouble sleeping lately.

"I guess with that incident two weeks ago, I hope that PG&E will doing something to protect the neighborhoods," he said.

The camera inspection is being done at the request of the California Public Utilities Commission and with the permission of the National Transportation Safety Board, who is leading the investigation.


Load Comments