Concern about addictive, intense video game Candy Crush

There is a growing concern over the addictive nature of a popular video game, called Candy Crush.
October 18, 2013 8:12:37 PM PDT
There is a growing concern over the addictive nature of a popular video game, called Candy Crush.

More than 45 million people play Candy Crush every month. Most of them are women, between the ages of 25-55.

Many say the quest to reach the next level is so intense; they can't put the game down.

"Well, I was on vacation in Cancun and I'd find myself leaving the pool to go back to the room and I would sit there and I'd be playing Candy Crush trying to get to the next level," said Candy Crush player Denise D'Andrea.

"The psychiatrists, psychologists, this is on the list of diseases they're looking at to say, 'Is it an addiction in the way that gambling is an addiction.' They haven't decided that, but it's got all the properties. People lying about the amount of time that they're spending on this; it's affecting relationships and work," said ABC News Chief Health and Medical Editor Richard Besser, M.D.

The game is free to download, but players can buy additional lives, and that's a big part of the problem.

People are spending big money to keep the game going. And while that's bad for them, it's a sweet deal for the game's creators. They're said to be making $636,000 each day. That comes out to $231 million a year.


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