Bay Area groups work to help Nepal rebuild 1 year after massive quake

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It's been one year since a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal. Nearly 9,000 people died, over 21,000 were injured and millions were left homeless - and most of them still are.

It's been one year since a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal. Nearly 9,000 people died, over 21,000 were injured and millions were left homeless - and most of them still are.

Thousands of homes have yet to be rebuilt. That's despite billions of dollars in foreign aid, pledged to help rebuild Nepal.

When the earthquake struck, buildings collapsed and people streamed into the streets in fear.

Fremont resident Jonathan Khoo was there and says his California training kicked in.

"People were running down the stairs, as things were shaking. It helps you prepare mentally so you have a plan of attack even if you don't have a conscious effort," said Khoo.

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He didn't know it immediately that he survived a massive earthquake.

"It shook a very large part of the country, not only Kathmandu the capital city, but the surrounding areas," said Dr. Walter Mooney, with the U.S. Geological Survey.

Since then, international aid groups have swooped into the country to help, including teams from the Bay Area. But the Nepal government is still struggling to manage the aftermath.

RELATED: Bay Area aid group brings relief to Nepal for quake victims

Currently, there are countless temporary shelters because the rebuilding process has been very slow.

Doctor Mooney says some people are reverting to unsafe building methods because they just want to get a roof over their heads.

"I did see a number of buildings being built brick by brick, stone by stone, in the old fashion way," said Mooney.

The slow rebuilding pace could make for lost opportunities to make the country safer for the next quake.

Almost immediately after the quake, government ministers were asking visitors to return.

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Khoo says he hopes to go back sometime soon.

"I think people should go and still support the tourism which has been and continues to be a large part of their economy," said Khoo.

Currently, there are no travel advisories to Nepal.

Two local groups involved in the rebuilding process are Motherland Nepal and Nepal Youth Foundation.

For full coverage of the Nepal earthquake, click here.

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societychildrenu.s. & worlddonationsnon-profitchild rescuefoodearthquakesearch and rescuecharitiestravelbay area
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