Game developers conference comes to SF

March 2, 2011 7:16:42 PM PST
If you're a gamer, the place to be is the Moscone Center at the 25th Annual Game Developers Conference. There, you can see the future of an industry that is growing exponentially.

There is a lot of action in the newest in video games and the advanced equipment to play it on. These people talk about creativity in their business.

"They talk about best practices, they talk about how to make better games, They talk about innovation, They talk about the future of technology, new trends," event director Meggan Scavio said.

Nintendo is launching its new 3DS on March 27 and it will sell for $249.95.

"You see 3-D graphics without glasses. This is one of the most connected devices Nintendo has ever made," David Young from Nintendo said.

Creators are making their games more complex. Intel showed off new fast performance chips that challenge game makers.

"The developers take awhile to take full advantage of our hardware, because we throw a lot of good hardware at these guys over the years. Our CPUs are really fast and our graphics are really good," Dan Snyder from Intel said.

A German company has come up with games in real 3-D, which means you have to wear the glasses. Seattle's Spoon.net launched a new service that lets you get more than 200 games free -- including the classic PAC-MAN.

"It's a delivery mechanism. Take any PC game and launch it from the web with a single click," Ben Zulauf from Spoon.net said.

Surprisingly, industry game leader Electronics Arts has a small office to meet one-on-one.

The Game Developers Conference had its beginning in 1988 in a San Jose living room and about 25 people showed up for that one. Now 25 years later, 18,000 people are here.

This is serious business. Universities have game programs and for the second year, USC was named the top school for video game design. This is a showcase of design, artistry, engineering and the future.


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