First local 3-D print shop opens in Oakland

A Bay Area couple has opened Northern California's first 3-D print shop in Oakland and found holiday shoppers are already coming.
December 23, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
In the past year, 3-D printing has become all the rage in the tech community, but now, a Bay Area couple wants to bring it to your community. ABC7 News took a look at what they're calling Northern California's first 3-D print shop and found the holiday season in full swing.

On the bustling sidewalk of Oakland's Montclair Village, what used to be a jewelry store is now showing off a different kind of jewelry.

"This is a 3-D printed necklace. It was a designer out of New York. It was only $35," said Liza Wallach.

Wallach used to sell the expensive kind of jewelry until she met her husband Nick Kloski who had a passion for something else expensive and exotic... 3-D printers.

"They say that 3-D printing is going to be the cornerstone of the next industrial revolution," said Kloski.

And a few years ago, when some patents expired that made 3-D printing cheaper, they made plans to turn the family jewelry store into the first Holleybee 3-D print shop.

"It brought us together because his natural talent and interests in technology and my interests in business and design are really the perfect match for 3-D printing," said Wallach.

Jewelry's just the start of it. People are coming in to print out snowflakes for the holidays.

"You could take one of these snowflakes in your computer and modify it," said Kloski.

"These are actually gecko 3-D printed snowflakes," Wallach.

And there's a whole display case of other ideas like a model tank or little Tyrannosaurus rex.

Some of the 3-D prints start with an idea. Others start with an object in the real world, scanned with a device that looks a little like an iron. It's actually a handheld 3-D scanner. You can also edit the things you scan.

They teach classes here on 3-D modeling, even for kids. One passing dad said he wants to let his kids design their toys for Christmas.

"What they want to make, so I can support their ideas. Sometimes, you know, adults are less creative. They're much more creative," said Heesoo Lee, a father.

And though the printers themselves are mesmerizing, it is more about the link they form between dreams and reality.

"To help make sure that people's ideas don't just sit in their brain forever," said Kloski.


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