Local superdelegate feeling pressure

April 22, 2008 11:40:37 AM PDT
Those so-called superdelegates are a hot commodity and getting hotter. No one is feeling the pressure more than uncommitted superdelegate, Congressman Sam Farr. We talked with the Bay Area lawmaker about the arm twisting he's feeling in Washington.

Congressman Sam Farr says his undecided superdelegate status makes him a popular target of the soft sell.

"Everybody wants access to you, but it isn't high pressure in sales. It's interesting. It's not like voting on a controversial issue. It's sort of low key," says Farr.

For the record, Senator Hillary Clinton and her husband have both called Farr personally. So far, Senator Barack Obama has left the conversations to his staff.

"It's a struggle between your heart and your mind. In many cases, the mind says the experience counts and the heart says but enthusiasm is what politics is all about," says Farr.

Congressman Sam Farr's district was divided in the February primary. Santa Cruz voted for Obama. Monterey and Salinas backed Clinton. Overall, the district broke in Clinton's favor by about three percent.

Senator Clinton's edge may have come in part from her visit to Salinas in January.

"I think she's fantastic. I think she's an awesome person and I hope to God she wins," says Clinton supporter Patricia Carver.

Farr says the primary showing was too close to consider it a mandate from his constituents.

"In this congressional district, it's a toss up," says Farr.

Bill Malone is an Obama supporter and president of the People's Democratic Club in Santa Cruz. He thinks Obama's momentum will eventually sway Farr.

"If he makes his decision now, he's gonna' upset half the people. If he waits, it may not be so bad," says Malone.

Farr admits he is waiting to see if a clear winner emerges and that could leave him undecided all the way to the convention. He also predicts the two candidates will eventually work together.

"If Barack were the nominee, his biggest support will be Hillary and visa versa because they both know what's at stake and it is the entire appointment process, the entire cabinet, the entire brain trust of the United States of America," says Farr.

At least for now, that possible unity is reserved for the future.


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