Bonds to kick-off Macy's tree lighting

October 7, 2008 8:56:35 PM PDT
UCSF Children's Hospital is gearing up for a fundraising drive to help the families of children with terminal illnesses. The money comes from buying lights for the Macy's Christmas tree.

For Giants fans, this is your post-season -- no red, white and blue bunting. No crowds, just a press conference with new general managing partner, Bill Neukom, who was already talking future.

"We think our young talent supply is quite good," said Neukom.

As for the old talent supply, well, he made a public appearance too.

"I am happy now because I have so much more time. I am enjoying myself immensely," said Former Giant Barry Bonds.

He's your left fielder of the past, but very much a part of the present for UCSF Children's Hospital.

He is this year's honorary chair for the hospital's Compass Care Program, which provides in-house, hospice comfort for children with terminal conditions, and their families.

"These are my children. I am honored to be part of this," said Bonds.

"People should honor people for what they do, not what they say. We're seen what Barry bonds does here and it is remarkable," said UCSF Children's Hospital Executive Director Roxanne Fernandes.

"His heart is as big as his bat"

It is a completely different image from the one we have seen more recently and perhaps the remaking of one.

The Barry Bonds they know has visited this hospital many times -- shunning attention there as much as in the public arena.

Most of the stuff he does is not publicized. He never allows cameras or media."

On the seventh floor, Lisa Purser tells of a little boy with brain cancer. Bonds has visited too many times to count.

"He was able to touch this child. He had such heart, and touched him in a way that for people can identify," said Lisa Purser from UCSF Children's Hospital.

So when Barry Bonds helps to sell lights for the Macy's Christmas tree next month, he lends name and image to a cause he knows intimately.

He is a man, with an uncertain future, who seems to know that the pain of a life cut short supersedes that of a baseball career.


Load Comments