Making solar power affordable for everyone

August 7, 2009 4:43:52 PM PDT
Save money on your utilities and add value to your home.

Benefits of solar

  • Home solar leads to significant savings over time. With solar, you lock in a rate for your electricity, which means you won't be subject to increasing utility rates over time. Over 25 years this can add up to $50K to over $100K for an average-sized home.

    1. How much you save immediately with solar depends on your home and how much power you use. Many people start out by locking in a modestly discounted rate today, which becomes a big discount in 10 years.

  • Getting solar also means supporting your community. Every time a home goes solar, that means a crew of people who design and install it, who are based locally.

  • By getting home solar, and without making any changes to lifestyle, a family can reduce the pollution from their home by almost 50%. This is a bigger impact than you can make by adjusting your life. For example, it's over twice as effective as driving 100 fewer miles per week in your car.

    1. Your home creates more pollution than your car - this is true for most Americans, although a lot of people don't know that and address the car but not the home.

    2. Creating and transmitting electricity in the U.S. is expensive, and it creates pollution. As we grow, the pollution is going to get worse and it's going to get more expensive.

  • SunRun has a unique solution for homeowners that makes solar very easy and affordable. With SunRun, homeowners get:

    1. The ability to get started with solar panels for as low as $1,000 without complicated paperwork or a second mortgage.

    2. A system that's proactively monitored and cared for by SunRun for as long as they are a customer.
On being a woman starting a local company
With a strong background in business and finance, Lynn is one of the youngest women executives to run a venture-capital backed business.

Lynn chose to turn down offers to return to the finance industry when she graduated from Stanford's Graduate School of Business. During school, she had begun to think a lot about how she could apply her financial background in a different way. She and classmate Ed Fenster (SunRun's CEO) had a lot of conversations about energy and how important it is. By the time they graduated, they had already begun working on SunRun.

The first SunRun solar system is on Ed's home in San Francisco, which was also the site of the company's first offices. Although the company has long since moved into business offices, it has remained a business for homeowners.

As a busy woman juggling a career, a husband and a new home, Lynn understands just how difficult it is to keep a household running and how little time most people have to think about their electricity. Because of this, she's championed solar services that are easy to understand, easy to get and easy to maintain.

Reactions from PG&E on SunRun

PG&E is generally supportive of alternative energy.

All SunRun homes are connected to the grid, so when a PG&E customer gets solar with SunRun they will still have a relationship with PG&E. The homeowner has a give and take relationship with PG&E. When their panels are producing electricity (when it's sunny), they might not be using all the electricity they're producing, and that energy flows into the grid where other PG&E customers can use it. When it's nighttime and their panels aren't producing, they're using energy from PG&E. Without this relationship, solar wouldn't be workable for most people.

You can also learn more at http://www.sunrunhome.com

About Lynn Jurich, President, SunRun, Inc.:
Lynn is a Bay Area resident who co-founded SunRun because she believes going green is the most important social objective and economic opportunity of the 21st century. Previously Lynn was a member of the investment team at Summit Partners, a venture capital and private equity firm with over $9 billion under management. During her tenure at Summit Partners, Lynn completed investments with an aggregate market value of over $900 million in the financial services and technology sectors. Lynn holds an MBA and BS from Stanford University.


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