Classes resume after shooting at Oikos University

In an April 10, 2012 photo, Efanye Chibuko touches a picture of his wife Doris during a memorial at Oikos University in Oakland, Calif. Doris Chibuko was among the victims of a shooting rampage at the Oakland school. some students at a California Christian college on Monday April 23, 2012, will resume attending classes in a building where seven people were killed (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
April 23, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
Oikos University in Oakland reopened Monday, three weeks after a shooting rampage that ended with the deaths of seven people. But, only one class was held at the site.

At the reopening of the university, students and faculty quickly rushed toward the university building trying to avoid reporters. A spokesperson said 17 of the 22 students in the English-as-a -second-language class showed up.

The president and founder of Oikos said it was too early in the process to try to talk to students, but Lucas Garcia, a teacher who was in the building when the shootings occurred, described the mood of his students.

"They've been expressing how they feel, just the emotions of sadness and how scared they were that day and stuff like that," Garcia said.

Nursing students were off campus at an undisclosed location or doing their clinicals at hospitals. Many of them witnessed the shootings or knew the alleged gunman.

"They are a little leery, but they wanted to go back; everyone we talked to really wants to finish," Oikos University nursing program director Ellen Cervellon said.

Cervellon initially thought she was the intended target. She had refused to refund salleged gunman One Goh's tuition after he dropped out. She was relieved when police later said she was not the person he was after.

"Oh yes, for me and my family, and just everybody basically; I'm not the target, thank God," Cervellon said.

The nursing students will not finish their classes at the university's main property. Their classes will be held at another school.

For those other students who just couldn't go back, they were invited to Unitek College in Fremont, where efforts are being made to accept them.

"At this point we want to help," said Nav Bawa, the COO of Unitek College. "We're not sure what the future of Oikos is as a school and the students, I'm sure, need to feel that there is another place for them to go in case the school shuts down."

Oikos, which is Greek for "family" or "household" says next week it will remove the shrine at the front door and try to get it back to normal.

The school has set up a memorial fund for the victims and their families. People are also leaving condolences on the university's website.

ABC7's Alan Wang contributed to this report.


Load Comments