San Jose motorcycle cop hurt in crash with vehicle

A San Jose police officer is in serious condition after he was thrown from his motorcycle after colliding with a car. The
November 15, 2013 6:45:04 PM PST
A San Jose police officer is in serious condition after he was thrown from his motorcycle after colliding with a car. The accident happened at the corner of 4th and Empire streets, just north of downtown San Jose in a mostly residential neighborhood.

It appears that the motorcycle officer and the sedan were both going southbound on 4th Street. There was extensive damage near the driver's side front tire, indicating the motorcycle may have been overtaking it.

Phuong Ton was inside her market nearby when she heard the collision make a large bang.

"I see the officer, she said. "He lie down on the ground and he didn't move. It had me scared. He didn't move."

The officer was taken to the hospital where he's reported to be in serious condition with non-life threatening injuries.

"The other driver is cooperative and we are currently conducting an investigation to figure out how the collision occurred," Sgt. Heather Randol said.

The driver of the Ford Focus did not appear to be injured. He was walking around after the collision.

San Jose police blocked off a large area as officers began to document and investigate what happened.

Santa Clara County this week kicked off a campaign to educate drivers what to do when they hear sirens and see flashing lights of police vehicles, fire rigs and ems vans.

"We've seen people do everything from pull to the right, pull to the left, keep going, go faster, go slower, stop down. It just is quite amazing," said Santa Clara County Fire Department Deputy Chief Steve Prziborowski.

Santa Clara County responds to 109,000 EMS calls a year. A new public service announcement is aimed at getting people to pull over and stop.

The PSA says, "Pull to the right for sirens and lights, drive to the right edge of the road, stop until the emergency vehicles pass."

That protocol is not only for the safety of first responders, but also for patients and accident victims needing urgent care.

"It allows us to provide patient care in the back of a moving emergency vehicle," county EMS director Michael Petrie said. "It allows us to get the patient to the hospital as quickly as possible."