Group marks Occupy Oakland's 1-year anniversary

October 10, 2012 5:56:31 PM PDT
In Oakland Wednesday, the Occupy movement is marked a one-year anniversary. It's a movement that's involved thousands of people at times, with messages about the economy, and protests that sometimes turned violent. Starting as a way to sound off against banks and bailouts, Occupy Oakland has taken many forms since it started.

At Broadway and 20th Street, some area banks and businesses chose to mark the anniversary by boarding up and covering their windows. A year ago demonstrators made up of teachers, activists, and everyday folks, started camping out at City Hall's Frank Ogawa Plaza and Snow Park. While the tents came down for good in November, the demonstrations continued for months. The peaceful participants pushing an agenda of 'equal distribution of wealth' took a backseat to anarchists and demonstrators rallying against the city's police department.

As recently as Sunday night, City Hall and area businesses were once again the target of protesters breaking windows. ABC7 News spoke with some residents who say they understand the cause behind the original movement.

"I hope the conversation continues," said Oakland resident Darcy Reed. "I hope that people continue to speak about these things that need to be talked about, and don't just forget when the new fall lineup comes on."

Fellow Oakland resident Gregg Marrama adds, "I wish the message that's going forward would be a little more peaceful. I mean, I certainly understand the reason behind Occupy. I agree with much of what they talk about, but this is my city, I love this city, I hate to see things get destroyed."

The Occupy Oakland group that started a year ago has not gone away, but they have lost some of their numbers. On Wednesday they planned a birthday party at Snow Park.

The first rally for Occupy Oakland happened at City Hall and that spot eventually became a campsite and eyesore to many people working and living downtown. For their part, Oakland police have said that they will take a 'stand-back-and-watch' approach, and call for resources if things get out of hand.


Load Comments